On the Verge of Exploding

June 13, 2016
TIME: 8:50 a.m.
LOCATION: General Population,Ross Correctional, Chilicothe, OH

While I don’t believe that there are too many people that read this blog, to all those who do, I apologize for my hiatus of not updating it for a while. I have been battling with some serious bouts of stress due to the everyday rigors of prison life, while at the same time, trying to focus on my participation in the production of the documentary that’s being made about my situation of injustice. It’s extremely hard to concentrate when you’re in a cell with another person that gets on your nerves by shaking his top bunk over you. I have asked my cellmate, multiple times, to stop shaking the bed, which he does by shaking his foot a million times a minute, but he keeps doing it. This might seem like a small thing, but it has put me on the verge of exploding! And when you add this with the fact that I’m also stuck in a cell with a person that doesn’t like to clean up, this makes my situation that much more frustrating.

In addition to dealing with the constant stress of prison life, I’ve also been dealing with being depressed due to my full realization that my next-to-nothing family doesn’t care if I ever get out of prison. In spite of having reached out to my family in an open letter, in which I asked them to support the crowd-funding campaign that was created on my behalf to raise money for the leasing of a billboard to display a message highlighting my situation of injustice, they all completely ignored my plea for help.

Prior to the launching of the campaign, which was unsuccessful, I practically begged my family to help me. But instead of helping me, they didn’t even respond to me … and they left me for dead. As of today, though, I’m completely done with reaching out to people who clearly don’t give a damn about me. All my life I have been trying to be accepted by people, but today, I’m through playing the role of
a desperate fool. The writing on the wall is crystal-clear, and as an adult, I have to accept the reality of my situation.

Besides dealing with the stress of prison life, I’ve just been thinking about the coming days when the public is going to be made aware of the full scope of the injustice that DRC and the Parole Board has subjected me to. Right now, DRC and the Parole Board–even the Governor and Attorney General–they all know that I’ve been subjected to being assaulted, framed, discriminated against, and railroaded, yet and still, they refuse to do anything about it. Instead of them affording me the justice that they are supposed to be the keeper’s of, they go back-and-forth to work and pretend to be oblivious to what is going on. Yes, in 1993, I broke the law. But all of the aforementioned knowingly break the law, everyday, that is, when they remain silent about my situation of injustice.

Here’s an update about my excessive use-of-force federal lawsuit against DRC correction officers (Goudlock v. Blankenship,Case No. 1:13-cv-1215):

On April 19,2016, the magistrate judge presiding over my case, agistrate Judge Kathleen B. Burke, made a recommendation to the court that my “post-handcuffing” claim of being assaulted by the officers should be allowed to proceed to trial. If the Court goes along with the recommendation, it will be a significant battle won for me, because I will be appointed an attorney by the Court, and be on the verge of being able to subpoena and cross-examine everyone who was complicit in the assault, as well as cover-up. And, if the Court does, in fact, follow the recommendation, I intend to send invitation letters to the local and national media, as well as to journalism students, asking them all to attend and cover my trial.

I want to expose to the world how diabolical the U.S. criminal justice system can be towards indigent prisoners. This is the only way that the injustice and corruption will ever end inside of broken criminal justice systems, such as Ohio’s.

I’m going to end this posting on that note. But, if you are reading this, and are interested in helping me in my fight for true justice, freedom, and equality, I ask that you, please contact me … because simply having empathy for my situation, without any action–it’s not going to get me out of prison.